FAQs

FAQs

General

  • Projects would be funded through a proposed ½ % sales tax over 15 years. The revenue generated by the 1/2% sales tax would fund revenue bonds totaling over $209 million, the proceeds of which would be used to fund the proposed projects.
  • Utilizing revenue bonds will allow completion of all project phases on an expedited basis.
  • Estimated bond size with 3.75% interest rate and assumed revenue of $11-15 Million annually derived from a 1/2% sales tax increase over the duration of the bond terms
  • As this was a citizen led initiative, the language passed by the city council creates a citizen oversight board that will be instrumental in overseeing the development of all of these projects.
  • The package includes revenue to help cover maintenance and operation of these facilities. We all know, we don’t want to build something if we can’t take care of it.

Library

  • The current library was built in 1966, and was the flagship and crown jewel of Norman. At the time the library served a city of approximately 42,000 residents. A half-century later, Norman is the third largest city in the state, with a population of more than 116,000. The current library is no longer adequate for the demands of a community that made more than 1.1 million circulation transactions in 2013 and sees more than half a million visitors during the year.
  • Registered library card holders has increased by 17.6% to 86,364 in the last six years.
  • A new east side library branch, almost identical in size to the branch recently opened west of the Interstate, is needed to serve residents in the area of town. This will be built on city-owned land near the new fire station on Alameda.

Parks

  • More than 50 neighborhood parks will see improvements such as shade structures, playground equipment, pavilions and new seating.

  • By completing Ruby Grant Park and John Saxon Park, Norman will add more than 200 acres of park land for the community. Ruby Grant Park – 146.5 undeveloped acres; Saxon Park – 67 undeveloped acres

  • Personal Health Benefits of parks and recreation include:

  • Increasing the frequency of exercise especially among children and youth with better access to parks.
  • By completing Ruby Grant Park and John Saxon Park, Norman will add more than 200 acres of park land for the community. Ruby Grant Park – 146.5 undeveloped acres; Saxon Park – 67 undeveloped acres
  • Personal Health Benefits of parks and recreation include:
    • Increasing the frequency of exercise especially among children and youth with better access to parks.
    • Improving psychological and social health with exposure to nature.
    • Playing which is critical for child development.
    • Reducing the risk of heart disease, diabetes, obesity, depression, and other health problems by staying active.
  • Community Benefits of parks and recreation include:
    • Providing opportunities for all people to be physically active, socially engaged, and cognitively stimulated.
    • Providing opportunities for rest, relaxation, and revitalization.
    • Preserving and interpreting historic community assets.
    • Providing opportunities for community involvement and volunteer work.
    • Providing refuges of safety for at-risk youth which can help reduce juvenile delinquency.
  • Environmental Benefits of parks and recreation include:
    • Protecting and preserving vital green space.
    • Protecting and preserving critical wildlife habitat.
    • Educating visitors regarding the appropriate use of natural areas for recreation.
    • Contributing to clean air and clean water.
  • Economic Benefits of parks and recreation include:
    • Making the City significantly more attractive.
    • Increasing resale value and property taxes of homes. Studies have proven that the property value of homes near parks have a higher value than those further from a park, which correlates to higher resale values and property taxes.
    • Stimulating economic development by attracting businesses and keeping residents.
    • Increasing tourism.
    • Attracting new businesses to a community by improving the standard of living and quality of life.

Pool upgrades

  • The City of Norman is bringing together the public school system, non-profit organizations and our health providers to create an indoor pool for all of Norman. These public-private-non-profit partnerships will help make operational costs cheaper for taxpayers.  
  • A new pool added to the current YMCA will be open to the public for a variety of recreational, senior, and training activities such as swim lessons for the entire family.
  • Westwood Pool will also receive nearly $12M in upgrades. The current pool was built in the 1960's and is nearing complete infrastructure failure.
  • Operational costs will be shared between several partner organizations. 
  • The public will NOT need to be a member of the YMCA to use the facility.
  • The Norman High and Norman North Swim teams currently rent the OU pool. The facility is in need of upgrades and allows limited use since it is open to the public. The teams cannot practice year-round due to restrictions, such as Christmas break when the University is closed.

Youth Sports

Griffin Park

  • All of Griffin park will be devoted to soccer and will not infringe on the Sutton Wildlife area. It will create 20 youth fields and an indoor soccer field, as well as a few fields with turf so the seasons can be extended.    It will renovate parking and create a destination for travelling teams which will help our local economy.
  • Soccer is an extremely popular sport for Norman families and youth. There are currently more than 2,200 registered soccer players with the Norman Youth Soccer Association.
  • Edmond hosted the US Youth Soccer Region III championships in 2013. More than 200 teams from 11 states for a four day tournament had an estimated economic impact of $8 million. Source: News OK article.
Reaves Park
  • Care will be given to protect our fabulous veteran’s memorial as well as to make certain Reaves remains available for valued community events like the Medieval Fair.   It will create 18 youth baseball and softball fields.  With these renovations, fields will be suitable for holding regional events and will be boost our local economy while providing our youth with a healthy pastime.

Indoor Sports Facility
  • To be located on North Base near the existing YMCA, this facility will replace the World War II era hangers for city of Norman youth basketball and volleyball teams.  The multi-use facilty will feature 12 courts of various size. 

“A superior parks and recreation system in a city increases the quality of life because of the many benefits that if offers to that community. Parks are the single most visible positive expression of a city government at work. Benefits of parks and recreation may include personal health benefits, community benefits, environmental benefits, and economic benefits.”
~ Parks Master Plan, City of Norman